What Is Required to Work As a Food Handler in Utah?

Utah food handlers must have a Utah Food Handlers Permit to work in the state. Food handlers can enter the state with a food handler’s permit or even without one if they choose. A permit is required for all persons who work with food on a regular basis, but this doesn’t mean that every employee needs to be licensed.

Utah Food Handlers Permit

As a general rule, the basic requirements for Utah food handlers are that they are over the age of 18, a U.S. citizen, and a resident of Utah. They also must be able to read and speak English fluently. Some employers require that a food handler demonstrate proof of health insurance. If they are working off the clock, they may need a business license and a commercial license as well.

A business license for food handlers is needed, as well as a food handler’s permit. The latter is required to work in an industry that deals with the production of food, whether it is retail food or restaurants. Employees also must pay a sales tax on their sales or use of commercial space.

A lot of people think that food handlers in Utah are the type of people who generally do the preparation or shopping of food. This couldn’t be further from the truth. In reality, food handlers also do the packaging, preparation, and clean up of food.

Because food handlers are the ones who make sure the food is safe to eat, it is very important that they have the proper food handler’s permit. Anyone who isn’t a licensed food handler is probably not fit to work in the food industry. There are other things you need to know as well.

The Food Handler’s Permit for Food Handler’s Permits for people who do the preparation and cleaning up of food must be renewed each year. If your permit is not renewed, you can’t work as a food handler in Utah. You also will be required to pay a license fee at this time as well.

The Food Handler’s Permit for Food Handler’s Permits for people who pack, package, or prepare food must be renewed each year. If your permit is not renewed, you cannot work as a food handler in Utah. You also will be required to pay a license fee at this time as well. By law, you can only work for one employer at any given time.

You may want to work as a food handler in Utah for several reasons. For example, there are state food services that make house-made hot dogs, sandwiches, salads, and pizzas. The state also provides free grocery coupons for food jobs in the state.

Other jobs that are available in Utah involve food manufacturing. All of these jobs require food handlers who have the proper food handler’s permit to operate in the state. These jobs can be found at food processing plants and restaurants.

There are also other jobs that are available in Utah. This includes ones which require individuals to learn the art of cooking. In order to work in this area, individuals need to meet all of the requirements for food handler’s permits.

Utah food handlers also must carry their food handlers’ permit at all times. They also have to fill out forms about their food handling job with their employer at the end of the day.

Thinking about remodeling your restaurant?

Scope

Do your homework! There are the obvious improvements that you want to make, whether its kitchen upgrades, bar redesign, outdoor dining space, or “just” trim and paint. Before you hire a Contractor, make sure that you’re as educated as possible on what is changing and what else may be impacted. For example, if you are renovating a bathroom, does your local code require it to be ADA compliant? Plan for the worst and strive for the best. Being unprepared for the unexpected isn’t an option.

Budget

While there are countless drivers of cost, having a realistic budget established prior to starting a renovation project is critical. With any renovation project there will be unknowns, so you’ll want to accommodate for those as much as possible before getting started. A trusted and experienced general contractor can help you with this.

Schedule

In a perfect world, everything goes per plan. But with renovation projects, expect the unexpected. When planning, be realistic. Also, check with your City, Town, or Municipality as there may be work or parking restrictions that could hinder progress. Review and talk through the schedule with your general contractor and make sure that you are both on the same page. Think ahead and always have a plan-B in your back pocket.

Availability

No matter how “good” a set of construction documents may be, there will always be questions. Make sure that you or a trusted team-member is available to review progress and answer questions on a daily basis. Things don’t always look the same in person as they do on a 2-dimensional set of drawings. Catching something that you may want to change early on will help mitigate change orders and schedule delays.

Communication

As with any successful endeavor, communication is key! Before selecting a general contractor, make sure that you are comfortable with how well and clearly they communicate. If they’re difficult to get ahold of before you sign a contract, this trend will likely continue throughout the project. Thoroughly talk through the project and ensure that their interests are aligned with yours. When those are encountered, ask them for their opinion as to what may be obstacles during the formulate a plan and build if and. Open communication throughout the project will keep expectations in check and confidence levels high.

  • Make sure you are up-to-date with ever-changing and new fire and building codes
  • Familiarize yourself with the leading trends on how the customer interfaces with the process of ordering and receiving product.
  • Research ADA Codes that may or may not have been in place prior to the remodel

-Consider the sales presentation and attraction of the first impression upon entering.

-Consider how the food prep and service line is laid out with respect to the queue or line to the cash wrap.

-Be mindful of ceiling treatment or certain architectural elements that assist with noise control based on occupancy.

-Make sure you are mindful of the flow. It is always important to consider the flow of the service staff vs the customer convenience while navigating the space.

-Consider branding that may or may not have been strong in previous space.

-Finally, make sure to be strategic with the kitchen layout and efficiency to ensure that the staff can be held to a manageable number.

It’s important to align your furniture with your business model.

There are the obvious improvements that you want to make, whether its kitchen upgrades, bar redesign, outdoor dining space, or “just” trim and paint. Before you hire a Contractor, make sure that you’re as educated as possible on what is changing and what else may be impacted. Review and talk through the schedule with your general contractor and make sure that you are both on the same page. Make sure that you or a trusted team-member is available to review progress and answer questions on a daily basis. Before selecting a general contractor, make sure that you are comfortable with how well and clearly they communicate.